Video Introduction to ThingSpeak and the Internet of Things

Our very own Robert Mawrey produced a video introducing ThingSpeak and the Internet of Things.

ThingSpeak Intro Video

ThingSpeak is an open data platform for the Internet of Things. Your device or application can communicate with ThingSpeak using a RESTful API, and you can either keep your data private, or make it public. In addition, use ThingSpeak to analyze and act on your data. ThingSpeak provides an online text editor to perform data analysis and visualization using MATLAB®. You can also perform actions such as running regularly scheduled MATLAB code or sending a tweet when your data passes a defined threshold. ThingSpeak is used for diverse applications ranging from weather data collection and analysis, to synchronizing the color of lights across the world.

At the heart of ThingSpeak is a time-series database. ThingSpeak provides users with free time-series data storage in channels. Each channel can include up to eight data fields. This tutorial provides an introduction to some of the applications of ThingSpeak, a conceptual overview of how ThingSpeak stores time-series data, and how MATLAB analysis is incorporated in ThingSpeak.

[via MathWorks]

Celebrate the Holidays by Joining CheerLights, a Global Network of Lights #iot

For the third holiday season in a row, the CheerLights project is gearing up. The idea behind CheerLights is to show that we are all connected by synchronizing the color of lights around the world. Christmas lights are a staple around the holidays and with Internet-connected lights, the color of your lights matches the color of everyone else’s lights.

It has been a real treat watching this project evolve as more and more people add lights… and other things. Things like Android and iPhone apps that check the latest color of CheerLights, Christmas trees, and robots.

To control the lights around the world, send a Tweet mentioning @CheerLights and a color. The command is processed by the ThingSpeak IoT analytics platform and distributed to all of the lights listening to the CheerLights API.

@CheerLights I am dreaming of a White Christmas

Internet of Things

Another powerful aspect of the CheerLights project is that is shows off what is possible with the emerging Internet of Things. With a single message sent via a social network like Twitter, 1000′s of objects around the world are in sync with each other. Lights are connected by many types of controllers, such as Arduino, ioBridge, Philips, and the Raspberry Pi. This project is only possible through the Internet and the coordination of developers around the world.

In the article, “How the Internet of Things Will Change Our Lives“, CheerLights is included to indicate how we are connected and how objects may bring people closer.

Learn how to join the project at CheerLights.com.

We are all connected…

Réaliser une courbe, un graphique avec ThingSpeak tutorial [French]

[fredblabla] created a video tutorial on how to make a chart with ThingSpeak. This tutorial is in French and clearly explains how to setup a channel, post data to a channel, customize the charts, and add plugins to your ThingSpeak Channel page.

Merci beaucoup.

[via YouTube]

Getting Started with ThingSpeak – Video Tutorials

“You might have recently heard about ‘Internet of Things’. You may even be wondering what things are…”

We are starting a video tutorial series, so you can see how to get started with ThingSpeak right away. The first two videos are available now along with our 20 other tutorials for ThingSpeak. Check out the Tutorials section of the ThingSpeak Community website.

Introduction to the “Internet of Things” and ThingSpeak

ThingSpeak Channels

Connecting Arduino to ThingSpeak using Python

Over on the Tenet Technetronics Blog there are some great posts about how to connect Arduino to ThingSpeak using Python as the middleware. Please check it out and thank them for putting together an awesome ThingSpeak Application Note and video. The video demonstrates publishing sensor data to the web using ThingSpeak and Python. The sensor data is collected by an Arduino MCU.