Arduino WiFi 101 ThingSpeak Data Uploader Tutorial

Arduino has published a tutorial for their WiFi 101 Shield that sends data to ThingSpeak. The Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is a powerful Internet of Things shield with crypto-authentication that connects your Arduino or Genuino board to the internet using WiFi.

Arduino WiFi 101 ThingSpeak

You only need a few things to build a light and temperature sensor that writes data to ThingSpeak:

  • Arduino Zero or Uno Board
  • Arduino Wifi Sheild 101
  • Photocell
  • Temperature Sensor (This example uses a TMP36)
  • 10K Ohm Resistor

Arduino_WiFi_1010_ThingSpeak

Once you have the circuit built, you create a ThingSpeak channel, connect the Arduino WiFi 1010 to your Wi-Fi network, and install the source code from the tutorial on the Arduino.

Data is now being sent to your ThingSpeak Channel. Go to your channel to see two charts of the light and temperature data. To take the project a step further, go to ThingSpeak Apps and use MATLAB to analyze and visualize and trigger actions from the data.

[via Arduino.cc]

Official ThingSpeak Library for Arduino and Particle

We are thrilled to announce the official ThingSpeak Communication Library for Arduino and Particle devices. This library enables an Arduino or other compatible hardware to write or read data to or from ThingSpeak, an open data platform for the Internet of Things with built-in MATLAB analytics and visualization apps.

Arduino IDE Installation

In the Arduino IDE, choose Sketch/Include Library/Manage Libraries. Click the ThingSpeak Library from the list, and click the Install button.

Particle / Spark IDE Installation

In the Particle/ Spark Web IDE, click the libraries tab, find ThingSpeak, and choose “Include in App”.

Compatible Hardware

  • Arduino or compatible using an Ethernet or Wi-Fi shield (we have tested with Uno and Mega)
  • Arduino Yun running OpenWRT-Yun Release 1.5.3 (November 13th, 2014) or later.
  • Particle Core or Photon (Formally Spark)

ThingSpeak Examples

The library includes several examples to help you get started.

  • CheerLights: Reads the latest CheerLights color on ThingSpeak, and sets an RGB LED.
  • ReadLastTemperature: Reads the latest temperature from the public MathWorks weather station in Natick, MA on ThingSpeak.
  • ReadPrivateChannel: Reads the latest voltage value from a private channel on ThingSpeak.
  • ReadWeatherStation: Reads the latest weather data from the public MathWorks weather station in Natick, MA on ThingSpeak.
  • WriteMultipleVoltages: Reads analog voltages from pins 0-7 and writes them to the 8 fields of a channel on ThingSpeak.
  • WriteVoltage: Reads an analog voltage from pin 0, converts to a voltage, and writes it to a channel on ThingSpeak.

Complete source code and examples for the ThingSpeak Library are available on GitHub.

Database Performance Upgrades #featurefriday

With over 20,000 active streams of “Internet of Things” data, the servers that make up ThingSpeak.com are humming.  We recently made extensive upgrades to the database system that stores all of data generated by things from all around the world.

“We switched to SSD drives for all of our database servers,” said Lee Lawlor, Lead Engineer of ThingSpeak. “All of the upgrades are live and available to the entire ThingSpeak Community!”

The improvements decreased response time dramatically and improved large data set retrieval by ten times.
ThingSpeak Multiple Feed Read_Times

[Official Tutorial] Monitoring Linux Server Statistics

ThingSpeak can be used to easily monitor CPU usage %, memory usage %, and disk usage % on any Linux machine connected to the internet.

First, create a new Channel, and fill out the field names as follows: Field 1 = “CPU Usage (%)”, Field2 = “Memory Usage (%)”, Field 3 = “Disk Usage (%)”.

ThingSpeak Channel Settings

Next, add the open-source server statistics script to your server, which can be found at: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/iobridge/thingspeak/master/lib/server_stats.sh

Inside the script there’s an API Key variable, which should be replaced with your specific Channel’s API Key (leave the single quotes, and only replace the X’s): api_key='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'

For the script to work properly, install the “bc” package via: sudo apt-get install bc

Then make the script executable: chmod +x server_stats.sh

Finally, edit your crontab file: crontab -e

Make the script execute every minute by adding this line to your crontab (make sure you use the proper path to the script): * * * * * /path/to/server_stats.sh

The script will then automatically POST server stats to the Channel specified by the API Key every minute.

You can see some of the ThingSpeak server statistics here:

 

ThingSpeak Launches New Website

Things want to speak…

We keep hearing about how many Billions and Billions of things there will be connected. Just think about how much data that they will create! Yep, it’s Big Data, or even, Bigger Data. ThingSpeak is the only open data platform specifically designed for the Internet of Things available ‘in the cloud’ or on your own network to capture and distribute data from things.

A new homepage for ThingSpeak

When we look out into the Cosmos, we see Billions and Billions of stars and keep a fond memory of Carl Sagan in our hearts. As we connect this planet, we can’t but think of the scale and the magnitude that IoT will bring. Using this inspiration, we launched the new ThingSpeak.com!

ThingSpeak Homepage

Carl Sagan said, “We have lingered long enough on the shores of the cosmic ocean, we are ready at last to set sail for the stars.” We believe the same about the Internet of Things! Let’s get going!

[Official Tutorial] Connecting Electric Imp to ThingSpeak IoT Data Services

Build Open Data Applications with Electric Imp and ThingSpeak!

Electric Imp is a connectivity platform for connecting Wi-Fi devices to cloud services, much like RealTime.io and Iota Wi-Fi modules and Spark.io. Some Electric Imp module’s come in an SD card form factor and adds Wi-Fi connectivity to what’s connected to the Electric Imp module. Access to the Electric Module happens via the Electric Imp cloud. While connectivity is simplified with the Electric Imp system, you will need a data service like ThingSpeak to complete the Internet of Things experience. Once data from Electric Imp devices are in ThingSpeak, you can easily build applications and interactivity with other devices and platforms.

Electric Imp to ThingSpeak Internet of Things

We put together a quick start tutorial for the Electric Imp and ThingSpeak, so you can quickly and easily get the Electric Imp talking to ThingSpeak. The tutorial uses parts from SparkFun – the Electric Imp Wi-Fi SD module, breakout board, and USB cable / power supply.

Get started now…  Check out the official Electric Imp and ThingSpeak Tutorial and source code on GitHub.

Battery-powered Temperature Logger with ThingSpeak + Electric Imp

[Marcus Olsson] of slickstreamer made a battery-powered temperature logger using ThingSpeak to store and visualize the data collected. He chose the Electric Imp Wi-Fi module for connectivity. The project is complete with a 3D printed case.

ThingSpeak Electric Imp Temperature Logger

All of the source code to connect Electric Imp to ThingSpeak and the 3D printer design files are available on Marcus’ blog ‘slickstreamer‘.

[slickstreamer / Dangerous Prototypes]

The Top 10 Internet of Things Countries According to ThingSpeak Stats

In 2013, ThingSpeak was used in 158 countries and territories. The vast majority of the traffic came from countries in North America, Europe, Australia, and South America. ThingSpeak is growing quickly around the world!

ThingSpeak IoT World Map

The Top 10 Internet of Things Countries*

  1. United States
  2. France
  3. Poland
  4. United Kingdom
  5. Germany
  6. Netherlands
  7. Australia
  8. Canada
  9. Italy
  10. Brazil

*According to ThingSpeak Usage Stats

Introducing TalkBack, the New Internet of Things App to Control Things with the ThingSpeak Cloud

Introducing… TalkBack!

We have developed a new ThingSpeak App and it is available now to all ThingSpeak Users.

The new TalkBack App allows devices to check ThingSpeak for commands to execute. TalkBack is perfect for battery-powered devices that need to sleep most of the time and wake up to see if there is anything to do and then go back to sleep, like a door lock for example. The lock is mostly going to be asleep to save battery power, but it can wake up periodically and check TalkBack or be woken up by a button press to see if it should be opened or not.

Devices powered by ThingSpeak and now with TalkBack will be able to both push sensor data to the ThingSpeak Cloud and check TalkBack if any commands are available all in one request. To get started, we have the complete TalkBack API Documentation and an Arduino Yún Tutorial available now.

ThingSpeak TalkBack to Cloud

Atmel-powered Arduino Yún Tutorial

With the release of TalkBack, we created a tutorial for the Arduino Yún. The “Yún” is a special combination of easy-to-program Arduino with an additional processor, an Atheros AR9331, running Linux and the OpenWrt wireless stack. Programming the Arduino via USB is identical to the Arduino Leonardo. Once the Arduino Yún is connected to Wi-Fi, the Arduino has full access to ThingSpeak Cloud Services and the TalkBack App and API. Check out the Controlling the Arduino Yún with TalkBack tutorial for a step-by-step way of controlling the Arduino Yún via TalkBack and the ThingSpeak Cloud.

Arduino Yun ThingSpeak TalkBack Tutorial

TalkBack is available now to all ThingSpeak Users and to new users by Sign Up for Free at ThingSpeak.com! Please feel free to share with us and the ThingSpeak Community with the awesome ways you use TalkBack with your ThingSpeak Projects!

New API for Public ThingSpeak Channels Makes it Easy to Discover Open Data

ThingSpeak is growing quickly these days. Our traffic is high and the user growth is soaring. Thanks to everyone for your interest and patience as we continue to stabilize, add more servers, and add more features to help with your Internet of Things projects.

Question: How do I find ‘public’ ThingSpeak Channels?

In order to help developers find open data inside of ThingSpeak Channels, we created a new API for searching the public ThingSpeak Channels.

Here are the Public ThingSpeak Channels. We order the channels by activity and completeness. Channels may be tagged and this helps find data that you might find interesting for your application. We also have API commands that you can pass to the ThingSpeak Channel API to return the public ThingSpeak Channels in either JSON or XML format.

Here are some easy examples:

For support and questions, please use the ThingSpeak Forum.