Weather Station with Particle, SparkFun, ThingSpeak, and MATLAB

[Haodong Liang] has released a weather station project with full MATLAB data analysis, device source code, and procedures on He used the Particle Electron to connect the SparkFun weather station to ThingSpeak anywhere covered by a 2G/3G cellular data network. The project demonstrates how to build your own and start exploring data collected by ThingSpeak with MATLAB.

MathWorks Weather Station

The project also shows you how to use MATLAB to get very detailed visualizations and data analysis of the data collected by the weather station. Some of the examples include histograms of temperature, humidity, and pressure, curve fitting, daily comparisons, and 3D plots of temperature.

MATLAB weather station temperature plot

Visit for the complete tutorial to build your own weather station, connect it to the internet with the Particle Photon, collect your data with ThingSpeak, and do data analysis with MATLAB.


ThingSpeak is a New Hackster Platform for Sharing Projects announced that ThingSpeak is now a platform on their project sharing website!

Hackster Platforms

The ThingSpeak platform joins the likes of Amazon Echo, ESP8266 Wi-Fi, and platform. ThingSpeak users can easily document, share, and reproduce hardware and Internet of Things projects using We are already off to a great start with 13 documented projects and tutorials and 31 community members. Check out our platform on to discover great projects and build your own IoT projects.

Getting Started with IoT using the Particle Electron and ThingSpeak

Julien Vanier over at created a new tutorial showing you how to get started with the Internet of Things using the new Particle Electron and ThingSpeak.

Particle Electron Kit using ThingSpeak IoT

The Electron is a new 3G connected IoT device using cellular data and works anywhere you can get 3G in the United States. It is really awesome to plug-in a device and get it connected without the issues of Wi-Fi. This development kit also makes it possible to build battery-powered, mobile sensors. Good thing that ThingSpeak supports GPS data and offers sensor data analytics.

Check out Julien’s tutorial to go “From 0 to IoT in 15 Minutes” and other ThingSpeak projects on

Uber Ride Analysis with ThingSpeak and MATLAB

Have you ever wondered how long it will take to get an Uber at your location? This project uses ThingSpeak to log the ETA for an Uber service based on your latitude and longitude. We will use ThingSpeak’s MATLAB Analysis and TimeControl apps to track Uber’s ETA over time.

Uber Ride Estimate

The Uber API allows you to pass a latitude and longitude to determine the estimated time of arrival for an Uber car. The API also allows you to schedule a car. I have made a button that requests an Uber car and also schedules an Uber at the right time.

MATLAB Analysis Code

% Read the ThingHTTP for 'Uber Ride Estimate'
data = webread('')

% Convert the response to a number
eta = str2num(data);

% Write the data to the 'Uber Ride Estimate Data' ThingSpeak Channel

Each time the MATLAB Analysis code is executed, it will write the estimated time of arrival (ETA) for Uber to your ThingSpeak channel. To track the ETA over time, schedule the MATLAB code with TimeControl. I am running the code every 5 minutes to get an idea of when the peak times are for Uber to pick me up at my office in Natick, MA. Check out the ThingSpeak channel number 840700 to see the estimated times.


Step-by-step project details are available at