ThingView – Mobile App to See ThingSpeak Charts on Android Devices

Cinetica has released to Google Play, a new app to see ThingSpeak charts on Android smartphones and tablets. The app is called ThingView and has already reached 5,000 installs on Android devices!

ThingView Android App for ThingSpeak Charts

Even if you do not have devices and sensors sending data to ThingSpeak, you can still use ThingView to see public channels. For example, if you want to see the charts created by sensors in my house, just add Channel ID 9 to ThingView. You see charts of light levels and temperature generated by my house.

Check out ThingView on Google Play!

Send Windows Server Data to ThingSpeak using PowerShell

Do you maintain Windows Servers? If so, you might want to track server resources. ThingSpeak accepts data from anything and fits perfectly for server monitoring, visualization, and analysis. [NotHans] released a PowerShell Script to report Windows Server disk free space to ThingSpeak. Once in ThingSpeak, use a ThingSpeak to visualize server resources and send alerts to low disk space with ThingSpeak React. Use this PowerShell Script as a starter script to send data to ThingSpeak from Windows-based systems. Check out the open source script on GitHub.

[via GitHub]

ThingSpeak Used to Track Luggage for Travel Internet of Things Applications

[Chris Forsberg] created an example Internet of Things project to track luggage using ThingSpeak, an Adafruit GSM Module, and an Arduino. He built a simple system to send data to ThingSpeak, such as latitude, longitude, and status data. ThingSpeak exposes a data channel API for any system like this to being able to store data and then process the data.

ThingSpeak Travel IoT Project

The idea is that it is frustrating waiting for luggage at the airport and wondering where it is and why it is not on the baggage carousel. With this project, you can track luggage from start to finish. The advantages are not only for the traveler, the airlines could track luggage as well and get quality statistics for each airport. And, the base system has many applications outside of travel such as the Automotive Industry.

Chris explains the project really well on his blog and with a YouTube video.

ThingSpeak Data Channels – Now With More Metadata

ThingSpeak user [DodBasim]  requested an additional field inside of the ThingSpeak Data Channel. We named this new field “metadata”. This field works like the “status” field, but allows you to post any type of extra data along with your ThingSpeak Data Channel. An example would be to use the “metadata” field to store a JSON object that you want to parse with your application.

POST https://api.thingspeak.com/update
     api_key=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
     field1=73
     metadata={"officeTemp":73}

The full ThingSpeak Channels API is available on ThingSpeak Docs.

[via ThingSpeak Forums]

[Official Tutorial] Monitoring Linux Server Statistics

ThingSpeak can be used to easily monitor CPU usage %, memory usage %, and disk usage % on any Linux machine connected to the internet.

First, create a new Channel, and fill out the field names as follows: Field 1 = “CPU Usage (%)”, Field2 = “Memory Usage (%)”, Field 3 = “Disk Usage (%)”.

ThingSpeak Channel Settings

Next, add the open-source server statistics script to your server, which can be found at: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/iobridge/thingspeak/master/lib/server_stats.sh

Inside the script there’s an API Key variable, which should be replaced with your specific Channel’s API Key (leave the single quotes, and only replace the X’s): api_key='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'

For the script to work properly, install the “bc” package via: sudo apt-get install bc

Then make the script executable: chmod +x server_stats.sh

Finally, edit your crontab file: crontab -e

Make the script execute every minute by adding this line to your crontab (make sure you use the proper path to the script): * * * * * /path/to/server_stats.sh

The script will then automatically POST server stats to the Channel specified by the API Key every minute.

You can see some of the ThingSpeak server statistics here:

 

ThingSpeak Selects Phusion Passenger Enterprise to Power its Internet of Things API

The servers behind ThingSpeak have been slammed with data from all kinds of IoT devices and applications. We recently upgraded the entire backend of ThingSpeak and increased capacity to support our growth. One of the key decisions in our redesign was to select Phusion Passenger Enterprise to power the ThingSpeak “Internet of Things” API. Phusion Passenger’s “hybrid evented, multi-threaded and multi-process design” is perfect for the Internet of Things pattern for applications.

ThingSpeak Phusion Passenger IoT Application

About Phusion Passenger

Phusion Passenger is a web server and application server for Ruby, Python, Node.js and Meteor web apps. It makes web app deployments a lot simpler and less complex, by managing your apps’ processes and resources for you.

What makes it so fast and reliable is its C++ core, its zero-copy architecture, its watchdog system and its hybrid evented, multi-threaded and multi-process design.

New Spline Charts for IoT Data Visualizations

Once your data gets into ThingSpeak, you than want to do something with it. A first step is to see the data. If the data are sensor values from a Nest thermostat for example, then you want to see it as a chart. We added a new way to visualize your data by adding Spline Charts! Spline Charts are super easy to create with ThingSpeak, just add “type=spline” to your ThingSpeak Chart API call. (And of course, once you have it as a chart, you may want to embed it on our ioBridge Dashboard application.)

Here’s what the new Spline Chart looks like:

Here’s a regular line chart:

And just as a reminder, here are all of the supported ThingSpeak Chart types:

  • type=bar
  • type=column
  • type=line
  • type=spline

For complete ThingSpeak Charts documentation, check out ThingSpeak Docs.

Introducing TalkBack, the New Internet of Things App to Control Things with the ThingSpeak Cloud

Introducing… TalkBack!

We have developed a new ThingSpeak App and it is available now to all ThingSpeak Users.

The new TalkBack App allows devices to check ThingSpeak for commands to execute. TalkBack is perfect for battery-powered devices that need to sleep most of the time and wake up to see if there is anything to do and then go back to sleep, like a door lock for example. The lock is mostly going to be asleep to save battery power, but it can wake up periodically and check TalkBack or be woken up by a button press to see if it should be opened or not.

Devices powered by ThingSpeak and now with TalkBack will be able to both push sensor data to the ThingSpeak Cloud and check TalkBack if any commands are available all in one request. To get started, we have the complete TalkBack API Documentation and an Arduino Yún Tutorial available now.

ThingSpeak TalkBack to Cloud

Atmel-powered Arduino Yún Tutorial

With the release of TalkBack, we created a tutorial for the Arduino Yún. The “Yún” is a special combination of easy-to-program Arduino with an additional processor, an Atheros AR9331, running Linux and the OpenWrt wireless stack. Programming the Arduino via USB is identical to the Arduino Leonardo. Once the Arduino Yún is connected to Wi-Fi, the Arduino has full access to ThingSpeak Cloud Services and the TalkBack App and API. Check out the Controlling the Arduino Yún with TalkBack tutorial for a step-by-step way of controlling the Arduino Yún via TalkBack and the ThingSpeak Cloud.

Arduino Yun ThingSpeak TalkBack Tutorial

TalkBack is available now to all ThingSpeak Users and to new users by Sign Up for Free at ThingSpeak.com! Please feel free to share with us and the ThingSpeak Community with the awesome ways you use TalkBack with your ThingSpeak Projects!

ThingSpeak Java Client for “Internet of Things Applications”

[Andrew Bythell] created a ThingSpeak Java Client for the complete ThingSpeak API. This Java Client makes it really easy for Java (or Processing) developers to add cloud connectivity to applications and non-networked devices. “The purpose of the ThingSpeak Java client is to enable non-networked Device-to-ThingSpeak gateways and other applications for performing advanced analysis of data feeds,” said Andrew.

Java ThingSpeak Client IoT

So, by using Java, a simple “Hello World” app becomes this easy…

Channel channel = new Channel(channelNumber, apiWriteKey);
Entry entry = new Entry();
entry.setField(1, "Hello World");
channel.update(entry);

 

All of the source code and documentation are available on GitHub. Get started right away with building your Internet of Things with the Java Programming Language and the ThingSpeak Cloud.

Excellent work Andrew – thanks for contributing to the Open Source ThingSpeak Community!

[via Angry Electron / GitHub]

New API for Public ThingSpeak Channels Makes it Easy to Discover Open Data

ThingSpeak is growing quickly these days. Our traffic is high and the user growth is soaring. Thanks to everyone for your interest and patience as we continue to stabilize, add more servers, and add more features to help with your Internet of Things projects.

Question: How do I find ‘public’ ThingSpeak Channels?

In order to help developers find open data inside of ThingSpeak Channels, we created a new API for searching the public ThingSpeak Channels.

Here are the Public ThingSpeak Channels. We order the channels by activity and completeness. Channels may be tagged and this helps find data that you might find interesting for your application. We also have API commands that you can pass to the ThingSpeak Channel API to return the public ThingSpeak Channels in either JSON or XML format.

Here are some easy examples:

For support and questions, please use the ThingSpeak Forum.