20
Aug 15

You’ve Collected Lots of IoT Data, Now We Can Help You Figure Out What It Means!

For the last several years, I have been collecting data with ThingSpeak from devices all around my house. I have been tracking temperature, humidity, light levels, outside weather data, my deep freezer’s temperature, the state of My Toaster, and air quality metrics. I just recently started to think about what all of this data really means to me and if it’s good data to begin with. Wouldn’t it be great if I could explore my data in ThingSpeak?  Well, I am happy to say that with the latest upgrade to ThingSpeak, you can do just that.

We have been working with the MATLAB team at MathWorks to provide two new ThingSpeak Apps: MATLAB Analysis and MATLAB Visualizations. With these new built-in Apps, the ThingSpeak web service can automatically run MATLAB code. That makes it easier to gain insight into your data.

ThingSpeak MATLAB Apps

With the MATLAB Analysis app, I am now able to turn my home’s temperature and humidity data into dew point. Dew point is important to find out if the environment is comfortable independent of just knowing the temperature alone. If the dew point is too high or too low, your guests may notice their glasses sweating or that they are uncomfortable.

I am also able to clean up my sensor data and filter out bad data and write it back to a new ThingSpeak channel. From time to time, I see one of my sensors report a really high value, and I’d like to have a way to fix it.

We have provided many MATLAB code examples to get started quickly.

Some of our analysis examples include:

  • Calculate Average Humidity
  • Calculate Dew point
  • Convert Celsius to Fahrenheit
  • Eliminate data outliers
  • Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius
  • Calculate hourly max temperature
  • Replace missing values in data

With MATLAB Visualizations, we made it way easier to chart data from multiple data fields. By selecting the “Wind Velocity” example MATLAB Visualization, I can see a plot of the wind velocity data collected by my weather station.

MATLAB Plot Output on ThingSpeak

Other visualization examples include:

  • View temperature variation over the last 24 hours using a histogram
  • Plot wind velocity over the last hour using a compass plot
  • Understand relative temperature variation
  • Plot data from multiple fields
  • View temperature and pressure levels
  • Visualize relationship between temperature and humidity

Are you looking for an easy way to connect your Arduino or Raspberry Pi devices to ThingSpeak? We have also been working with the MATLAB team at MathWorks on some Hardware Support Packages to help with that. I’ll talk about that in a future blog!

This is really big news for the ThingSpeak Community. I am really excited to see what you do with these new apps. I will share projects on the blog as they come in. Let’s find out together what all of this data means. Get started at ThingSpeak.com!

 



18
Aug 15

[Kickstarter] nodeIT – Small, Stackable IoT Device

Kickstarter projects pop up all of the time. Developers are looking to raise money for their projects so they can order a larger production run and gauge market reaction. A lot of recent projects are trying to address the “Maker Community” by making it easier to prototype connected devices and sensors. We just found one called, “nodeIT” from Sweden.

nodeIT IoT device on Kickstarter uses ESP8266 and ThingSpeak

The nodeIT is centered around the ESP8266 Wi-Fi microcontroller and allows you stack other boards to extend its base functionality. Once the nodeIT is connected to your Wi-Fi network, you can easily publish data to ThingSpeak and visualize the results, such as data collected by a barometric sensor.

For more information about nodeIT, follow their Kickstarter campaign and check out their ThingSpeak Room Monitor project.

[via Kickstarter]



07
Aug 15

Collecting Dust Levels with ThingSpeak and ESP8266 Wi-Fi

Using the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module, [shadowandy] built a dust sensor to measure dust levels in his house. The project incorporates the Shinyei PPD42NS dust sensor to do the measurements and posts the data to his ThingSpeak channel from data collection and reaction to dust levels.

Dust Sensor sending data to ThingSpeak

The sensor records the PM10 and PM2.5 dust levels to get an accurate indication of the dust in the air. This project is a great example of how a little sensor could turn into something important for protecting machine shops, construction sites, and garages.

[via shadowandy / GitHub]



24
Jul 15

Soldering Iron Connected to ThingSpeak with #NodeMCU and #ESP8266 Wi-Fi

[Vegard Paulsen] created a solder iron that reports its usage and temperature to ThingSpeak and alerts him when it was left on. He uses an NodeMCU / ESP8266 Wi-Fi module to collect the data and post it to his ThingSpeak channel. Once the data is on ThingSpeak, he is able to send push notifications to his phone using the ThingSpeak React App.

Soldering Iron IoT ThingSpeak

Hackaday.com wrote an article about Vegard’s soldering iron connected to the Internet of Things. Here’s what they had to say:

The data pushes out to the ThingSpeak server which handles pushing data out to the bigger network, and data representation (like the cool Google gauge…). The best part: [Vegard] gets a phone notification when he accidentally leaves his soldering iron on. How perfect is that?

That looks a lot like our desks… wires, microcontrollers, pliers, cutters, Wi-Fi modules, and soldering irons. And now, the soldering iron is on the Internet of Things.

[via Vegard Paulsen / Hackaday.com]



15
Jul 15

Basement Dehumidifier Tweets Its Humidity with ThingSpeak and ESP8266 Wi-Fi

ThingSpeak user, Spencer, adapted a humidifier that sits in his basement. He is solving a common issue about humid basements. If your dehumidifier fails, you get wet things you have stored and then mold. Spencer created a humidity board using the DHT22 that measures humidity and then reports the data to his ThingSpeak Channel via the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module. Once the data is stored in ThingSpeak, he uses ThingSpeak React to update Twitter when things get out of whack.

Basement Dehumidifier Twitter

[via Twitter]



01
May 15

We are Growing Quickly… Want a Better IoT UX?

We are growing so quickly and adding a ton of new functionality that we don’t want to lose the User Experience (UX). We want you to be able to build Internet of Things projects in 5 minutes and gain insights, share data, and explore its potential without our software getting in the way.

ThingSpeak IoT UX Design

To help us understand what you are thinking, we created a card sort activity. If you click the link, you can sort out our current functionality into categories. We will use the results over many ThingSpeak users to help us organize and improve our website and UX.

Thanks for your feedback!



20
Apr 15

There is a Hamster on Twitter Now… Thanks to ThingSpeak, Arduino, and ESP8266 Wi-Fi

What does an adorable hamster need? Internet of Things, but of course. Using ThingSpeak, ESP8266 Wi-Fi, and Arduino, Ángel from San Sebastián built a monitoring system for his hamster which is dubbed “RunnerHam“.

Hamster Internet of Things

RunnerHam Tweets his distance and time when he takes a run on his wheel, “I’m done! 57.62m at 0.61m/s”. You can also check out his ThingSpeak Channel where he records lots of data about his day.

Hamster on wheel IoT ThingSpeak

Ángel also released an Instructables explaining his “pet project” so you can make your own and make your own enhancements. Just imagine what you can do with some sensors, connectivity, and ThingSpeak Web Services!

[via Instructables]



13
Mar 15

Send Windows Server Data to ThingSpeak using PowerShell

Do you maintain Windows Servers? If so, you might want to track server resources. ThingSpeak accepts data from anything and fits perfectly for server monitoring, visualization, and analysis. [NotHans] released a PowerShell Script to report Windows Server disk free space to ThingSpeak. Once in ThingSpeak, use a ThingSpeak to visualize server resources and send alerts to low disk space with ThingSpeak React. Use this PowerShell Script as a starter script to send data to ThingSpeak from Windows-based systems. Check out the open source script on GitHub.

[via GitHub]



27
Feb 15

Let Your Plants Tweet Using Spark and ThingSpeak

Head over to Instructables to learn how to make your plants Tweet using Spark Wi-Fi and ThingSpeak. Gregory Fenton created a project that monitors his plant’s soil moisture and then notifies him via Twitter when it is time to water it.

Spark ThingSpeak Plant Monitor

Greg built the project out of necessity to help his plants suffering from “localized drought”. Let’s hope his plants get proper watering and that other ThingSpeak users can quickly and easily build this project. Thanks for sharing!

[via Instructables]



12
Feb 15

Blynk Internet of Things App for Arduino to Support ThingSpeak Web Services

A really awesome Kickstarter campaign called Blynk has came to our attention as users from their community and ours were asking if our systems could work together.

Blynk Kickstarter IoT

Blynk is an Android / iOS app that allows for a 5 minute, out-of-the-box experience for Internet of Things projects. Blynk already supports Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and in the future Electric Imp, Spark, The Airboard, Wildfire by Wicked Device, Tiny Duino, and ESP8266 Wi-Fi.

ThingSpeak offers the Internet of Things stable data storage, fast retrieval, data processing, data visualizations, and hooks to every web service possible. We are thrilled that Blynk is planning to support the open APIs of ThingSpeak to extend any IoT project with ThingSpeak web services.

Blynk ThingSpeak IoT Kickstarter

The Blynk Kickstarter campaign ends at 12pm EST on February 14th. You have less than 48 hours to support Blynk! $20+ pledges will also get free 1 year premium account at Codebender.

[via Kickstarter]