19
Dec 14

CheerLights Arduino Sketch for FastLED Compatible Lights #featurefriday

We just created a FastLED and Arduino tutorial and Arduino Sketch to read in the latest CheerLights color and display it on FastLED compatible lights. CheerLights is a global network of colored lights that all synchronize to one color based on Twitter. People all around the world have built very creative displays of the latest CheerLights color. The new tutorial and Arduino sketch will make it easy to get started with NeoPixel lights from Adafruit and RGB-123 light panels.

CheerLights with Arduino FastLED RGB-123

For more information check out the FastLED and Arduino tutorial and the Arduino Sketch on GitHub.

[via ThingSpeak Tutorials]



12
Dec 14

Templates for Plugin Widgets #featurefriday

Plugin Widgets allow you to create custom visualizations for your ThingSpeak Channels by using HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. We just added a new feature that allows you to start with templates. We created a Google Gauge and a two axis chart widget!

Check out ThingSpeak Docs for more information about Plugin Widgets.



05
Dec 14

Instant TweetControls #featurefriday

We spent some time enhancing our TweetControl App. TweetControl allows you to control things with Twitter. You setup a TweetControl to listen for a keyword mentioned on Twitter and we execute any web service API call that you specify. Developers have created racing cars, political campaign trackers, and we use it for the CheerLights project.

As more and more users create TweetControls, the service started slowing down. We have enhanced how the service works and now you get instant TweetControls!

Check out this Instragram video sending a Tweet and changing the CheerLights color. You will see that there is little delay between sending the Tweet and executing the control command to change the colors on his Christmas tree.

Learn more about TweetControl on ThingSpeak Docs.



09
Oct 14

[Official Tutorial] Sending Tweets Automatically Every Morning With TimeControl

TimeControl can be used to send Tweets automatically at predetermined times.  In this tutorial, we’ll be sending a Tweet every weekday with the current time and the current CheerLights color.

The first step is to link a Twitter account to ThingSpeak.

Next, we’ll create a new TimeControl with the following values:

  • Name: “CheerLights to Twitter”
  • Frequency: “Recurring”
  • Days: “Mon”, “Tue”, “Wed”, “Thu”, “Fri”
  • Time: “9:40 am”
  • Fuzzy Time: “+/- 10 minutes”
  • Action: “ThingTweet”
  • Tweet: “It is currently %%datetime%% and CheerLights is %%channel_1417_field_1%%.”
  • Twitter Account: (select your linked Twitter account)

Save this TimeControl and you’re finished.  Every weekday within 10 minutes of 9:40 am in your timezone, TimeControl will send a Tweet with the current datetime and the current CheerLights color.

The CheerLights Channel ID is 1417, and colors are saved in field 1, so %%channel_1417_field_1%% will be replaced with the current CheerLights color.  You can change these values to access the most recent data from your own Channels.

Here’s an example Tweet from this tutorial.



03
Oct 14

[Instructables] Wi-Fi Temperature Data Logger

[noel portugal] is at it again! This time Noel created a simple Wi-Fi based sensor data logger using ThingSpeak, the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module, and a digital temperature sensor. At the heart of the project is a low-cost Wi-Fi module that could be the basis for many Internet of Things projects.

ThingSpeak WiFi Temperature Logger

Everything you need to know in order to build your own sensor logging project is on Noel’s Instructables.

[via Instructables]



26
Sep 14

ThingSpeak Introduces New Internet of Things App – TimeControl

A ThingSpeak App is a service offered by ThingSpeak that runs in the cloud to help you build connected projects and release connected products for the Internet of Things. We are happy to announce today that we are releasing a new app and we are excited to see what you do with it!

Introducing TimeControl…

TimeControl is a web service hosted by ThingSpeak that executes any type of HTTP service call or sends Tweets at predetermined times or schedules. We now offer one-time commands and weekly recurring schedules for commands. TimeControl executes a ThingHTTP or ThingTweet command, and ThingHTTP can interface with any external Web Service API by doing SSL, Basic Auth, custom HTTP headers, GETs, POSTs, PUTs, and DELETEs. ThingHTTP simplifies connecting low-power, low-resource microcontrollers to complex web service APIs such as Twilio, Xively, and Amazon. When you combine TimeControl + ThingHTTP, you get scheduled triggers to any web service you can imagine and scheduled control of an embedded IoT device.

TimeControl Examples Apps

Example TimeControl Projects

  • Turn on your lights every day at 4pm
  • Set a feeder schedule on your aquarium
  • Schedule full control of ioBridge and RealTime.io devices
  • Send a Tweet of your Channel’s last value every morning

ThingSpeak IoT Apps

  • ThingTweetLink your Twitter account to ThingSpeak and send Twitter messages using our simple API
  • ThingHTTPCreate custom POSTs or GETs to other web services and retrieve the data
  • TweetControlListen to commands from Twitter and then perform an action
  • ReactPerform actions when conditions are met by your data in your channels
  • TalkBackAllow devices to execute queued commands
  • TimeControl – Automatically execute ThingHTTP requests at predetermined times and schedules 

TimeControl Resources



28
Aug 14

Internet of Things #throwbackthursday #tbt #iot

It’s Throwback Thursday!

We have come a long way since building cloud platforms for connected devices – now known as “The Internet of Things”. Here’s what our first website for the ThingSpeak project looked like 5 years ago…

First ThingSpeak Website

Get started with IoT now:
Visit ThingSpeak.com or fork the project on GitHub!



11
Jul 14

ThingSpeak Data Channels – Now With More Metadata

ThingSpeak user [DodBasim]  requested an additional field inside of the ThingSpeak Data Channel. We named this new field “metadata”. This field works like the “status” field, but allows you to post any type of extra data along with your ThingSpeak Data Channel. An example would be to use the “metadata” field to store a JSON object that you want to parse with your application.

POST https://api.thingspeak.com/update
     api_key=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
     field1=73
     metadata={"officeTemp":73}

The full ThingSpeak Channels API is available on ThingSpeak Docs.

[via ThingSpeak Forums]



20
May 14

[Official Tutorial] Monitoring Linux Server Statistics

ThingSpeak can be used to easily monitor CPU usage %, memory usage %, and disk usage % on any Linux machine connected to the internet.

First, create a new Channel, and fill out the field names as follows: Field 1 = “CPU Usage (%)”, Field2 = “Memory Usage (%)”, Field 3 = “Disk Usage (%)”.

ThingSpeak Channel Settings

Next, add the open-source server statistics script to your server, which can be found at: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/iobridge/thingspeak/master/lib/server_stats.sh

Inside the script there’s an API Key variable, which should be replaced with your specific Channel’s API Key (leave the single quotes, and only replace the X’s): 

api_key='XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'

For the script to work properly, install the “bc” package via:

sudo apt-get install bc

Then make the script executable: 

chmod +x server_stats.sh

Finally, edit your crontab file:

crontab -e

Make the script execute every minute by adding this line to your crontab (make sure you use the proper path to the script): 

* * * * * /path/to/server_stats.sh

The script will then automatically POST server stats to the Channel specified by the API Key every minute.

You can see some of the ThingSpeak server statistics here:

 



09
May 14

ThingSpeak Selects Phusion Passenger Enterprise to Power its Internet of Things API

The servers behind ThingSpeak have been slammed with data from all kinds of IoT devices and applications. We recently upgraded the entire backend of ThingSpeak and increased capacity to support our growth. One of the key decisions in our redesign was to select Phusion Passenger Enterprise to power the ThingSpeak “Internet of Things” API. Phusion Passenger’s “hybrid evented, multi-threaded and multi-process design” is perfect for the Internet of Things pattern for applications.

ThingSpeak Phusion Passenger IoT Application

About Phusion Passenger

Phusion Passenger is a web server and application server for Ruby, Python, Node.js and Meteor web apps. It makes web app deployments a lot simpler and less complex, by managing your apps’ processes and resources for you.

What makes it so fast and reliable is its C++ core, its zero-copy architecture, its watchdog system and its hybrid evented, multi-threaded and multi-process design.